Intel to remove legacy BIOS from UEFI by 2020, will industry follow?

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armstrong
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Intel to remove legacy BIOS from UEFI by 2020, will industry follow?

Post by armstrong » Sun Apr 08, 2018 10:31 am

The PC Basic Input/Output System (BIOS) will turn 39 in three years, and as it turns out, this is when it is going to die on 64-bit Intel platforms. In recent years, Intel has implemented its Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) mechanism with legacy BIOS support as an additional option, however the company intends to remove legacy BIOS support from its UEFI by 2020 in an effort to improve security. For most users, the removal will go unnoticed, but for those who use and rely on legacy hardware on the newest platforms, it means migrating to other platforms.

BIOS functionality has evolved over the years, but its key purposes remained intact - run the POST (power-on self-test) to identify and initialize key system components (CPU, RAM, GPU, storage, DMA controllers, etc.), lead to OS boot and then provide certain I/O functions for older operating systems. Standard PC BIOSes from the early 1980s had numerous limitations (a 16-bit processor mode, 1 MB of addressable memory space), which needed to be hacked around starting in the late 1980s, but by the 2000s the industry started to move on to a new iteration: UEFI. UEFI was designed to not have decades-old constraints and is considerably more sophisticated in general.

In order to guarantee a smooth transition from BIOS to UEFI (by ensuring compatibility with legacy software and hardware that uses 16-bit OpROM), the Unified EFI Forum (which consists of virtually all the important developers/suppliers of hardware) defined several UEFI system classes and introduced an optional Compatibility Support Module (CSM) to UEFI class 2 to help smooth the transition.

The vast majority of PCs today feature UEFI class 2 and thus can expose either UEFI or BIOS interfaces, which can be selected in the BIOS configuration. There are systems that belong to UEFI class 3/3+ already (e.g., Microsoft Surface Book), but they are rare. In a bid to make capabilities like UEFI Secure Boot ubiquitous, Intel plans to remove CSM support from new client and server platforms by 2020. As a result, all new platforms from that point on will be strictly UEFI class 3.

Once CSM is removed, the new platforms will be unable to run 32-bit operating systems, unable to use related software (at least natively), and unable to use older hardware, such as RAID HBAs (and therefore older hard drives that are connected to those HBAs), network cards, and even graphics cards that lack UEFI-compatible vBIOS (launched before 2012 – 2013). Those who need older programs will still be able to run them in virtualization mode, but outdated hardware will have to be retired or remain on older platforms.

For the remaining years, Intel recommends to its partners to improve the UEFI user experience, promote UEFI features like secure boot, signed capsule and other, and remove DOS/BIOS dependencies from production maintenance tools. Essentially do everything to lower significance of CSM.

An interesting question regarding depreciation of legacy BIOS support on Intel’s new platforms is which of them will be the first to drop CSM in the client space. Intel is preparing a number of client platforms for mainstream desktop and mobile PCs (Cannon Lake, Ice Lake) to be released in the coming years, but at present we have no idea whether the company intends to trim CSM to a point in 2020, or if it will be a hard change over.

It remains to be seen whether AMD has similar plans - we have reached out to determine the state of play. The main reason Intel is performing this change is due to security, and certain OEMs may require specific UEFI features in their future products.
Last edited by armstrong on Sun Apr 08, 2018 1:51 pm, edited 8 times in total.

ChuckD
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Re: Intel to remove legacy BIOS from UEFI by 2020, will industry follow?

Post by ChuckD » Sun Apr 08, 2018 10:41 am

I really doubt industry will follow since this is a weak constraint, providing legacy support will help to win customers whose OS heavily relies on legacy BIOS. I bet OEM with in-house UEFI will not follow since adding legacy support cost them almost nothing.

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BobJC
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Re: Intel to remove legacy BIOS from UEFI by 2020, will industry follow?

Post by BobJC » Sun Apr 08, 2018 12:41 pm

This ugly legacy monster should have been adandoned long time ago. Intel really should block any potential hole and enforce this to happen. A lot of customers will never spend a penny on updating their legacy OS if they are not forced to. :roll:

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armstrong
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Re: Intel to remove legacy BIOS from UEFI by 2020, will industry follow?

Post by armstrong » Sun Apr 08, 2018 1:40 pm

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armstrong
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Re: Intel to remove legacy BIOS from UEFI by 2020, will industry follow?

Post by armstrong » Sun Apr 08, 2018 1:41 pm

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armstrong
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Re: Intel to remove legacy BIOS from UEFI by 2020, will industry follow?

Post by armstrong » Sun Apr 08, 2018 1:41 pm

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james.r
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Re: Intel to remove legacy BIOS from UEFI by 2020, will industry follow?

Post by james.r » Sun Apr 08, 2018 2:15 pm

Absolutely, removing this would remove a lot of development pain... But some companies just don't want to take the move since their aged legacy OS is in an isolated environment.

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BobJC
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Re: Intel to remove legacy BIOS from UEFI by 2020, will industry follow?

Post by BobJC » Tue Apr 10, 2018 5:07 pm

The information above is helpful. But the puzzle is still there... We can interpret CSM as "Continually Survived Monster" now. :lol:

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Re: Intel to remove legacy BIOS from UEFI by 2020, will industry follow?

Post by ChuckD » Tue Apr 10, 2018 5:12 pm

BobJC wrote:
Tue Apr 10, 2018 5:07 pm
The information above is helpful. But the puzzle is still there... We can interpret CSM as "Continually Survived Monster" now. :lol:
Thats a good one. :D

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uefi.tech
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Re: Intel to remove legacy BIOS from UEFI by 2020, will industry follow?

Post by uefi.tech » Tue Apr 10, 2018 11:53 pm

Quote from UEFI forum fw/os list...
Date: Mon, 9 Apr 2018 14:07:19 -0700
From: Blibbet <blibbet@gmail.com>
To: fw_os_forum@mailman.uefi.org
Subject: Re: [Fw_Os_Forum] Will industry follow Intel?s plan to remove UEFI legacy support?

I don't know any details of Intel's 2020 BIOS deprecation plans. I asked
Intel for questions, but got a complete non-answer, so don't expect
anyone from Intel to jump into this UEFI thread with details. :-(

I presume it means Intel will not longer ship Intel's BIOS
implementation on any of their boards, presumably only shipping UEFI.

If vendor is relying on Intel's BIOS implementation, they'll have to
find another implementation (eg, seaBIOS).

Vendor would also have to replace the firmware that Intel ships
(probably UEFI-based) with their 'aftermarket' BIOS-payload-based solution.

Today, Intel FSP is used by BIOS and UEFI. If Intel FSP no longer works
for non-UEFI systems, that could be an issue. Don't most Intel-based
vendors rely on FSP these days?

And Intel plans to deprecate BIOS in 2020 are their own. What are plans
of AMD and other x86-compat chip vendors? They may be other options for
non-Intel BIOS beyond 2020.

If nobody is maintaining the BIOS-centric code in Tianocore but Intel,
and they stop in 2020, then presumably the BIOS code will get bitrot and
eventually be removed, unless some vendor who wants BIOS support in UEFI
maintains it. AFAICT, most UEFI maintainers prefer UEFI-only firmware,
the CSM was Legacy code that nobody wants to see anymore.

Bare-metal aside, I presume BIOS will live on a bit longer in virtual
machines, supporting FreeDOS/MS-DOS legacy apps.

Again, I don't know Intel's plans for BIOS deprecation.

HTH,
Lee

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