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can bios be implemented by AI?

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future
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can bios be implemented by AI?

Post by future » Thu Apr 12, 2018 11:42 pm

if AI is used on bios, maybe, bios engineer will lost job, will it come true ?

Rajm
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Re: can bios be implemented by AI?

Post by Rajm » Fri Apr 13, 2018 3:19 am

There is no need to wait for AI to terminate BIOS engineer's career, Google is leading the trend to get rid of UEFI/ME.
Most BIOS jobs will then be transferred to OS kernel/driver development effort then. :roll:

This the the announcement for the talk on this year's Open Source Conference in Prague:
With the WikiLeaks release of the vault7 material, the security of the UEFI (Unified Extensible Firmware Interface) firmware used in most PCs and laptops is once again a concern. UEFI is a proprietary and closed-source operating system, with a codebase almost as large as the Linux kernel, that runs when the system is powered on and continues to run after it boots the OS (hence its designation as a “Ring -2 hypervisor"). It is a great place to hide exploits since it never stops running, and these exploits are undetectable by kernels and programs.
Our answer to this is NERF (Non-Extensible Reduced Firmware), an open source software system developed at Google to replace almost all of UEFI firmware with a tiny Linux kernel and initramfs. The initramfs file system contains an init and command line utilities from the u-root project (http://u-root.tk/), which are written in the Go language.
https://osseu17.sched.com/event/ByYt/re ... ich-google

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BobJC
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Re: can bios be implemented by AI?

Post by BobJC » Fri Apr 13, 2018 3:34 am

OK, interesting point. Yes, it could signify a level of dissatisfaction that could be sufficient to drive a big company into the arms of AMD.
Though personally, I guess I'm a bit cynical, and I basically expect Intel and AMD to think, "Why should we even care about fixing our stuff if Google will just do the engineering work themselves and keep buying our chips?"
I'd like to think it's a wake-up call, but the pattern of behavior here is unfortunately that chip makers think completely terrible software is OK, so rather than taking the proper lesson out of this and thinking that things need to change, I imagine Intel thinking Google is a bunch of weirdos.
On a side note, if we're talking about AMD using this as leverage to steal Google away as a customer from Intel, there are other factors that might dominate. Given the huge number of servers that Google uses, if Intel chips are 1% better in some way (like peak performance or compute power per watt), it's probably financially worth it for Google to pay a team of engineers to replace crappy firmware with an improved homebrew version and keep buying the chips that otherwise suit their needs better.

He.yang
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Re: can bios be implemented by AI?

Post by He.yang » Fri Apr 13, 2018 4:29 pm

Sounds it is not a good news for BIOS/UEFI developers.

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armstrong
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Re: can bios be implemented by AI?

Post by armstrong » Fri Apr 20, 2018 1:02 pm

Some AI algorithm logic surely could be used to improve UEFI user experience.

matt.huang
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Re: can bios be implemented by AI?

Post by matt.huang » Sat Apr 21, 2018 7:06 pm

Some companies use klocwork or Cast for static code analysis before release, decades ago there were actual people doing this job.
And yes, BIOS code or any other bootloader code could be implemented by AI, but losing a job is the last thing we concern for.

james.r
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Re: can bios be implemented by AI?

Post by james.r » Sun Apr 22, 2018 1:39 am

Competition and industry upgrade tend to perpetuate. Engineering work force will eventually be upgraded to accomodate the change. Take BIOS developers who are good at legacy programming as an example, most of them already adapt to the UEFI world.

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